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Rewire the commuter brain to take action.

Why it wasn’t easy

The “See Something? Say Something” slogan was universally recognized and understood by commuters, but precious few were actually speaking up and contacting authorities. We had to figure out what was stopping people from doing what they know is right.

Strategy

To determine why few travelers were speaking up, we researched and collaborated with behavioral scientists, security experts, criminal psychologists and academics. We identified the biases and heuristics that were barriers to action. The campaign materials were designed to get people to overcome the way their brains were hard-wired.

Outcome

We successfully took a campaign that had been running for years, built upon its well-established brand, and pushed the message forward. Our new approach went beyond building and reinforcing awareness. Post-campaign research and message evaluation proved the new campaign is impacting how people think about their role in keeping CT safe – with a 67% increase in transit riders' recall of the message that one person can make all the difference.

The work

One of the :30 TV spots setting the tone for the campaign

Interior car cards and lenticular posters located at train, bus and gas stations

Examples of :30 radio spots which run in tandem with TV during commute times

Mobile-friendly custom website used as part of the campaign’s call to action

Digital rotating posters strategically positioned on the schedule board at train stations

Promoted social media posts targeting Connecticut commuters

An original Connecticut Public Television documentary on See Something, Say Something

Challenge us

Got a problem that's furrowing your brow? We'd love to hear about it.